Posts Tagged ‘research’

A new study recently found that children who simultaneously participate in a physically engaging, time-based activity feel more positively towards each and can experience greater empathy for one another.

According to the lead author of the study, “[s]ynchrony is like a glue that brings people together — it’s a magical connector for people.”

synchrony on the drums in Kindermusik class

The word “synchrony” is key.  When people interact together in rhythm (or time), that’s synchrony.  And that’s what happens in every Kindermusik class – we tap sticks together, shake bells together, dance together, clap together, and so much more. Synchrony and the joint-collaboration involved explains why the Kindermusik experience is such a powerful one.

This study specifically references music and dance as two of the types of synchronous activities that bring children closer together – the kind of closeness that results in more cooperation and greater empathy for one another. Music and movement in a classroom are a powerful combination, but it’s not just about the academic and cognitive benefits anymore. It’s about all of those benefits and so many more, including the social and emotional benefits.

Simply put, this study emphasizes that allowing children to make music and dance together promotes the kind of pro-social behavior we need in our classrooms and in our society.

“‘The findings might be applied to formulate new strategies for education in our effort to build a more collaborative and empathic future society,’ she said.

“And studying this phenomenon in children is especially important, Rabinowitch added, since the connection between music and social and emotional attitudes manifests itself so early in life.”

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Looking for more ideas on how to use music to support the social-emotional development of children? Try our free e-books.

 

Contributed by Theresa Case who loves watching the beauty of synchrony unfold in every Kindermusik class she and her teachers teach at Piano Central Studios in beautiful upstate South Carolina.

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We love it when science backs up again and again what music teachers and parents have known for a long time – music and music classes have significant and far-reaching benefits that extend beyond singing, moving, and playing instruments and into areas of brain development, academic advantage, language development, literacy, and more.  In particular, new research is highlighting the powerful connection between music and
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Researchers continue to find more and more connections between music training and cognitive function. In a recent study, scientists determined that music training in the early years prevented the decline of speech listening comprehension, or speech recognition, in the later years of life. What may seem like a hearing problem in older adults may actually be a decline in the brain’s ability to parse,
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When it comes to gaining the most benefit from a music class, there are three essentials of participation – engagement, consistency, and longevity.  This according to a recent study led by Dr. Nina Kraus, the Hugh Knowles professor of communication sciences in the School of Communication and of neurobiology and physiology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern “Our results support
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“To researchers’ awe, music and movement experiences help children better self-regulate behavior and enjoy a safe, creative outlet for self-expression. Studies point to a specific cluster of social-emotional skills—called self-regulation skills—as particularly important for a variety of school successes.”  (Dr. Debby Pool, Vice President at Kindermusik International) According to a new study from Oregon State University co-authored by child development expert Megan McClelland, children with
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With increasingly more sophisticated technological advances, researchers are learning more and more about the powerful effects of music on the brain and the cognitive advantages of learning to play an instrument. A recent study at the University of Texas at Arlington gave researchers a unique glimpse into the brains of professional musicians, skilled musicians who had been playing an instrument for a number of
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How our brains regulate and manage cognitive processes is referred to as executive function.  As with most cognitive skills, executive function is a skill that grows and develops in children as they grow and develop. According to this recent and fascinating article in Science Daily, the executive functions that are crucial for a child to develop include the ability to: avoid distractions focus attention
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“Conjunction Junction wants your function? Hooking up words and phrases and clauses.” Do you know the rest of the lyrics to that old School House Rock favorite? Take a listen and sing along! You might be surprised to learn that the song provided more than a Saturday morning distraction. It also actually taught children about grammar. In fact, a first-of-its-kind research study from Vanderbilt
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Deanna Hanson-Abromeit, assistant professor of music education and music therapy at the University of Kansas, is doing some significant work in learning how music helps premature infants not just survive, but thrive, according to this recent article from the Kansas Health Institute. Dr. Joanne Loewy, director of the music therapy department of Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital in New York, highlighted some of the
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Do you ever wonder what newborns would say if they could talk? Where am I? What just happened? Who turned on the lights? Whew, that was a lot of work! I’m exhausted. Why is everyone staring at me? Do I have something on my face? Mom! Dad! It’s me! Truth is—most newborns all say the same thing: WaaaaWaaaa! Of course, children aren’t born talking.
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